Monthly Archives: February 2016

Word of the Week: Providence

Providence

Does the Bible teach that God’s providence works in human events to care for His people and accomplish His purposes?

What is God’s will for our lives?

Do the unexpected events that occur in our lives demonstrate the work and will of the Lord working to influence our choices and decisions?

These are questions each of us will face, sooner of later. They each relate to our word of the week, providence. Continue reading

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Sunday Seed Thoughts: Advice For Living Each Day To Its Fullest

Seed Thoughts

I recently came across an old piece from S. H. Payer that has taken on new meaning for me. I hope it speaks to you in a personal way.

Live each day to the fullest.

Get the most from each hour, each day, and each age of your life.

Then you can look forward with confidence, and back without regrets. Continue reading

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A Great Epitaph For Life

Epitath.Jimmy Wyatt

Sometimes when visiting a cemetery, I like to look for old grave markers and read the epitaphs. Many are predictable. Like “Rest in Peace.”  “Loving Mother.” Or “Faithful Father.”

However, some people, or at least their relatives, exhibited a sense of humor with the choice of epitaphs . Here are some actual inscriptions on tombstones.

Ezekial Aikle, buried in the East Dalhousie Cemetery in Nova Scotia, died at age 102. His Epitaph? “The Good Die Young.” Continue reading

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Overcoming Adversity

Adversity. Overcoming

Some of the world’s greatest men and women have been saddled with disabilities and adversities but have managed to overcome them. I’m not sure of the origin of this piece, but it expresses this thought well.

Cripple him, and you have a Sir Walter Scott. Lock him in a prison cell, and you have a John Bunyan. Bury him in the snows of Valley Forge, and you have a George Washington. Raise him in abject poverty, and you have an Abraham Lincoln.

Subject him to bitter religious prejudice, and you have a Benjamin Disraeli. Strike him down with infantile paralysis, and he becomes a Franklin D. Roosevelt. Burn him so severely in a schoolhouse fire that the doctors say he will never walk again, and you have a Glenn Cunningham, who set a world’s record in 1934 for running a mile in 4 minutes, 6.7 seconds. Continue reading

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GREAT VERSES OF THE BIBLE: John 11:25-26

Jesus'Resurrction

The Englishman John Donne was one of the great Metaphysical poets of the 17th century. His most famous sonnet “Death Be Not Proud” is  part of a sequence of poems called “The Holy Sonnets.”

The poet personifies death and says you are not as tough as you think you are. Continue reading

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Confidence in the Outcome

man.world

Last night I watched the Indiana-Purdue basketball game. It is one of the most intense and heated rivalries in college basketball.

They have played 203 times since 1901. The rivalry even has its own Wikepedia page describing notable disputes, technical fouls, ejection of coaches, overtime games and of course, the famous Bob Knight chair-throwing incident that happened 31 years ago today.

Last night I watched the #22 ranked Hoosiers match up with the #17 ranked Boilermakers with complete confidence that Indiana would win the game. Continue reading

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Word of the Week: Renewed

Renewed

Joe Theismann, now an ESPN sports commentator, enjoyed an illustrious career with Washington Redskins as an All Pro quarterback.

Theismann, who led the Redskins to two Super Bowl appearances–winning in 1983 before losing the following year. When a leg injury forced him out of football in 1985, he was entrenched in the record books as Washington’s all-time leading passer.

However, at the end of Theismann’s career he learned a bitter lesson. In an interview he said, “I got stagnant. I thought the team revolved around me. I should have known it was time to go when I didn’t care whether a pass hit Art Monk in the 8 or the 1 on his uniform. When we went back to the Super Bowl, my approach had changed. I was griping about the weather, my shoes, practice times, everything.” Continue reading

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